The Dangers Of One Party Government

Our nation is about to face a critical moment on January 5th, as Georgians vote for two senators. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler are Republicans and the Reverend Raphael Warnock and John Ossoff are Democrats all vying to become part of the highly politicized Senate.

I doubt I have very many readers who are voting in the election, but the contest is going have a monstrous national impact on the way we are governed prospectively. Therefore, every American should be aware of the implications of these two Senate campaigns.

Other than to say that the Democrats are radical and left-wing politicians, and the Republicans are relatively moderate lawmakers, I will address what could possibly happen in the future in Congress depending upon who is victorious.

If Democrats win the two seats, they will effectively control the Senate with a 50-50 split between Republicans and Democrats. Vice president Kamala Harris will vote in any ties. If Republicans win either contested seat, they will control the Senate.

What are the ramifications of having a Democratic-held Senate? It would mean that Democrats would control the presidency, the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Currently, the Senate business is subjected to filibusters by the minority party for all votes except judges and SCOTUS nominations. This means that judges and justices are confirmed with a simple majority vote. This changed several years ago when the Democratic majority voted to eliminate the filibuster, or a supermajority vote, to confirm judges. A few years later a Republican Senate majority voted to abrogate a supermajority vote for SCOTUS justices.

Currently all laws are enacted with a majority, unless the opposition filibusters the vote. Then the controlling party needs 60 votes to end the filibuster and enact a law. Democrats have threatened a vote to eliminate the filibuster for all Senate business. This would mean that the opposition party would have no power to stop any legislation for all intents and purposes.

You may ask why a filibuster is necessary. After all, the majority should rule. The filibuster became part of the lawmaking process so that frivolous and inappropriate legislation would be more difficult to enact. It is a way for the opposition to make it more difficult to enact laws that they believe are bad for our country. If a party has 60 votes in the Senate, as Democrats did during the early years of the Obama administration, there is no stopping the majority party if they also hold the presidency and the House.

Why is this issue critical at this moment? It’s because radicals in the Democratic Party have indicated that they would take action that will hurt our country our economy and our capitalistic system. Here is a short list of Democratic objectives:

  • The Senate can change the number of justices on the Supreme Court, thereby changing the political persuasion of the Court.
  • Congress would effectively change our economic system from a capital-based economy to a socialistic economy by bleeding the affluent and most successful among us.
  • The right of Americans to bear arms would be in jeopardy.
  • Immigration policy would be open borders.
  • Health care would be 100% socialized at an enormous cost.
  • Inane climate change policies would cripple industry.
  • Taxing policies would steal assets from hard working Americans.

Radical left-wing lawmakers would have a field day ripping down basic institutions like the banking system and high-tech companies.

The US would take several steps backwards just by the election of two Georgia senators.

Even if you are a Democrat, you should be aware of a country run by power hungry politicians with unlimited control over our government.