Syria And No. Korean Threats Are More Pressing Than U.S. Domestic Issues

Every day the world is becoming more dangerous. Terrorism inspired by ISIS and maniacal leaders of failed states have become clear and present threats to America and all free and democratic countries across the globe.

The Trump administration is attempting to deal with those that wish us harm. It’s going to be a mammoth project. Americans are dependent upon the president and his advisors to make sound decisions. It’s time that the mainstream political parties cooperate with the administration, and for Trump and his aides to set aside petty distractions for the greater good.

Specifically trouble is brewing in Syria and North Korea. Russia and Iran continue to support the madman Bashar al-Assad, and China has not yet taken appropriate action against the whacko Kim Jong-un.

Unlike the ongoing squabbles in Congress relating to health care, taxes and immigration, activities in the aforementioned countries involve truly deadly issues such as genocide, chemical weapons, nuclear threats and global terrorism

In Syria, with a nod from Russia, Assad has once again used chemical weapons against those that oppose him in his own country. A few years ago Russia brokered a deal in which Syria promised to never use WMDs and to give up their weapons. Assad violated the agreement and the U.S. launched missiles that destroyed some of Syria’s weapons last week.

As expected the Russians were mortified that the U.S. would attack a sovereign nation. The global community has censured Syria, and the U.S. is saying Russia approved the strike by Assad. Iran also supports Syria further proving to the world that its objectives in the Middle East are anything but noble.

The potential outcomes of all this aggressive action and rhetoric will result in the death of more innocent people, an extended ISIS struggle and a new Cold War between the U.S. and Russian. Military assets are already being maneuvered around the Middle East.

North Korea is a situation that has gone much further than anyone would have expected. The mentally unstable leader of the country is developing nuclear bombs along with missile systems to deliver them to South Korea, Japan and the possibly the U.S. The country has boasted that it has submarines that can launch nuclear missiles, which would make the country able to strike targets throughout the world.

The good news is that after parading its weapons in a holiday celebrating the birth of its first leader, Kim Jong-un’s grandfather, another missile test failed. It is possible that the assessments of No. Korea’s capabilities are being overestimated. But, we are talking about nuclear weapons.

The irony of this episode is that China has stood by and allowed Kim to create a great crisis. China abuts No. Korea. It would not be difficult for Kim to redirect missiles at China, it’s main ally, in a fit of rage.

Trump has respectfully asked China to stifle its No. Korean neighbor. The actions of China are being influenced by the specter of a unified Korea controlled by South Korean leadership, a strong ally of the U.S. It should be noted that China is the principal trading partner of both Koreas.

The Korean saga began after World War II when the Soviet Union and China refused to allow a unified Korea. This resulted in the Korean War in which North and South battled, with the U.S. and Russia and China supporting the South and North, respectively. Technically the war still is underway.

Any further intimidation may lead to a preemptive strike by the U.S., especially with the growing threat by No. Korea to launch against their southern neighbors, Japan and the U.S.

The worldwide political situation has become inflamed by the actions of two-bit thugs in Syria and No. Korea. U.S. politicians must stop stressing about nickel and dime issues relating our domestic problems and refocus on keeping the world out of a nuclear imbroglio.

 

 

 

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